Supermarket Savvy

  • The departments around the perimeter of the store tend to contain the “fresh” food; the center aisles have more of the processed foods.
  • Never go to the grocery store when you are hungry. Always shop from a list. Impulse buying usually results in less healthy purchases.
  • Keep a list of low fat foods you’ve tried and liked. Write the brand name on your grocery list.
  • In the beginning, label reading in the grocery store will slow you down. Give yourself plenty of time and be patient. It will get easier over time.
  • There are many store brands and off-brand low fat foods available that are less expensive than the national brands. Read the labels carefully.
  • All fresh produce is low fat except coconut and avocado. Fresh fruits and vegetables are less expensive and tastier than vitamin pills.
  • Few meats have nutrition labels on them. You can always trim edge fat, but it’s the marbled fat you can’t cut out. If nutrition labels aren’t on the package, find the cuts that look the leanest and have the least marbling.
  • Combination foods and mixes will often have two sets of numbers on the nutrition information label – one “as packaged” and one “as prepared.” If the “as packaged” numbers are good and you can make it with low fat or fat-free ingredients, these will be acceptable choices.
  • If time is a factor, many low fat foods are available “semi-prepared.” Boneless, skinless chicken breasts, broccoli and cauliflower florets, peeled baby carrots, salad or coleslaw in a bag, shredded low fat cheese, and marinated meats are some examples.

Tips and Hints to Help You Manage Your Diet

Parties, Holidays and Special Occasions

Dining Out

Supermarket Savvy